Scottish Rural Awards 2020 Finalist

Mossgiel Organic Farm: Finalist - ‘Most Sustainable Rural Business Award’, Finalist - ‘Best Countryside Digital Innovators'

Mossgiel Organic Farm – Finalists in the Scottish Rural Awards 2020 – Twice!!

Finalist – ‘Most Sustainable Rural Business Award’

Finalist – ‘Best Countryside Digital Innovators’

We were unbelievably grateful and delighted to be in the running for the Scottish Rural Awards 2020 and are even more excited to be in the finals! It is fantastic that Organic Dairy Farming is once again in the spotlight and it is great that all our campaigning is being recognised.

It has been a busy time since last awards night – never a dull moment! We’ve expanded the team and even built a new Dairy to cope with the increased demand. Onwards and upwards!

Last year we won the Agriculture Award, so fingers crossed for April. The night is set to be compèred by the one and only Jim Smith, so it should be a good laugh in any case! There is also word that there may be some whisky on the tables: that would have pleased a certain former tenant of Mossgiel…

O Whisky! soul o’ plays and pranks!
Accept a bardie’s gratfu’ thanks!
When wanting thee, what tuneless cranks
Are my poor verses!
Thou comes-they rattle in their ranks,
At ither’s a-s!

Robert Burns“Scotch Drink”

You can see the full list of awards and finalists here.

Calf-with-Cow

Calf-At-Foot

Calf-with-Cow means Calves stay with Cows until they are weaned

We operate a Calf-with-Cow policy. This means that at Mossgiel Organic Farm, our calves stay with their Mothers until they are old enough to be weaned – usually between 6 and 8 months. This is when the calves begin to socialise together in groups and not stay at the Cow’s side every second of the day.

Calves are born without any antibodies in their blood and the Milk that they take from their Mother in the first 2 days is extra important in quickly building up their immune systems.

It has been the convention in the UK to remove calves from their Mothers after a day or two. This is very distressing for both the Cow and the Calf. It is also something that we believe is unnecessary and we actively campaign for other Farms to join us in stopping it as a practice.

Do baby calves drink a lot of milk? Yes, yes they do!

Does this mean that we have less to bottle and sell to you? Yes, it does.

Why do we do things this way?

Farming Organically means that we are not placing an undue burden on our Cows. An Organically Farmed Cow will produce between 8 and 12 litres of Milk per day. This compares to the figure of between 25 and 30 litres per day that conventional methods force out of Cows. Forcing Milk production adversely affects the health of the cow in many ways, the most severe of which is that it shortens its life. A conventionally farmed Cow might have a life expectancy of around 5/6 years whereas an Organically farmed Cow can live to 12/14 years.

We Farm Organically and we expect our Cows to have a long and healthy life. We therefore want them to get off to the best possible start in life. That’s why we feed them nature’s original super-food: Milk.

Mossgiel Farm nominated for Scottish Rural Awards 2020

Mossgiel Organic Farm Nominated for Scottish Rural Awards 2020

Mossgiel Organic Farm nominated for Scottish Rural Awards 2020

We are delighted to announce that we have been nominated for the Scottish Rural Awards 2020!! 🙂

A massive thanks thanks to all at the Farm who continue to make everything possible and, of course, to our wonderful supporters who are helping change the face of Scottish Dairy!

Good luck to all the other nominees too – some awesome stories out there!

Winner – Person of the Year

Winner of the Slow Food Awards Person of the Year 2019

A lovely end to the year with Bryce becoming the Winner of the Slow Food Awards Person of the Year 2019.

The Slow Food movement promotes food that is produced with an emphasis on quality, not profit.

‘Slow Food is for everyone who eats food,’ said Fred Berkmiller, Chef Proprietor of L’Escargot Blue which won Best Restaurant.

‘I consider slow food to be my grandmother’s thinking,’ he said. ‘People have the right to know where their food is coming from, what it’s been fed with. They want to know what they’re putting inside their body.’

 

There was even a lovely write-up in Scottish Field, which you can read here, which said;

“Bryce Cunningham of Mossgiel Farm, winner of the Agriculture category at the Scottish Rural Awards 2019, won Person of the Year at the Slow Food Awards for his sustainable practices.

Mossgiel was the first diary in Scotland to eliminate single use plastic.

‘We’ve managed to create food products in a slow, natural and organic way to bring our passion for food to the cities of Scotland,’ Cunningham said. ‘I believe in low processed foods and foods that are natural, foods we would have eaten 500 years ago. Supermarkets are chasing profits, not health benefits.’ “

Slow Food Person of the Year 2019

It’s great that the slow food movement is gathering strength with each passing year. We certainly notice it, talking to all the wonderful people who own businesses that we supply. It seems that provenance is becoming more and more important to people and we think that this is a very encouraging trend. This move towards slow food – real food – and away from overly industrialised, processed food can only be a good thing, bringing people closer to nature and the seasons. Milk is a seasonal food, for example, and we know that this is something that has been lost from most people’s awareness. When the Cows are in the pasture in the height of summer they produce a richer milk than when they are in the byre in the depths of winter (4.9% cream in the summer, 4.5% cream in the winter). Decades ago, this was viewed as a problem. Today, we think that this is something to be embraced and celebrated.